Tweetable Python Code Golf

9th June 2015

Code Golf is the amusement of writing as short as possible a program to perform a given task. So for example, if the task is to compute the average of a list of numbers (which could be changed at any moment), you might do this: 140 characters (just by coincidence!), or this: 42 characters. In […]

Pi by J.Gabás Esteban

Playing in Python with Pickover’s Premise per Pi

1st June 2015

My favourite tweeter is Clifford A. Pickover. His tweets are delightful nuggets of math, physics & more. I have a copy of his fascinating The Physics Book. However, in these tweets, he claims that the string 44899 first occurs in pi at position 44899, counting from the first digit after the decimal point. I thought it might be […]

A Graphical Dice Simulator

31st May 2015

This PyGame program simulates the roll of a die (or dice if you prefer). It’s a fairly simple, straightforward thing to do, though it may be worth noting that the spots display is oh-so-slightly clever. Some spots appear in more than one number, e.g. the middle spot is in all the odd numbers, hence the […]

Mandelbrot Set by QuadTree

Fast Mandelbrot Set by QuadTree

27th May 2015

Most Mandelbrot Set programs proceed along the display area, pixel by pixel horizontally, row by row from top to bottom. This one doesn’t. It divides up the screen into 6 horizontal squares in 2 rows, then for each one, checks the value of the escape time for the pixel at each corner. If they’re all the […]

Python dictionary

A Python Dictionary

26th May 2015

This is simply a dictionary of Python keywords, implemented as – of course – a Python dictionary! Dictionaries are key:value pairs. The value can be any object, such as a tuple of strings. The first item in the tuple is part of the URL to documentation at Python.org, and the second item is a brief […]

Extensible Harmonographs

Extensible Harmonograph

18th May 2015

Often seen in science museums, the harmonograph is a device that combines wave motions (e.g. from some pendulums) to move a pen resting on a sheet of paper. These movements result in attractive patterns. This device can be simulated easily in a computer program such as the following one. The principle is that the wavy […]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/User:Wvbailey

Dr. Turing’s Automatic Machine

14th May 2015

Alan Turing published a ground-breaking paper in 1936, On computable numbers, with an application to the Entscheidungsproblem (PDF). It was about an esoteric problem in mathematics, for which he needed a theoretical model of how a mathematician computes with pencil & paper. He called this model an automatic machine; we now call it a Turing Machine, which […]

Editors & IDEs

12th May 2015

A text editor is all very well for simple notes, but for programming the basic text editor will quickly become very tedious. For example, Python uses code indentation to indicate ‘blocks’, using tabs or spaces (4 spaces recommended for each level of indentation). It will help a lot if the editor you use ‘knows’ Python! […]

Make ‘Computer Music’ with a very small program!

11th May 2015

This is a fun little program to generate ‘computer music’, specifically ‘bytebeats’ which sound like the chip music featured in the early computer games. As is well-known, sound can be digitised and stored in computers. Conversely, numbers can be converted to sound. But those numbers don’t have to come from a file, they can be generated on the […]

Easy Graph Plotting with Pyplot

7th May 2015

Graphs (also known as charts) are an indispensible visual aid for conveying a lot of data in an easy-to-digest form. Everyone is familiar with graphs in everyday life, such as those showing trends over time, e.g. world population, global warming, the cost of living, interest rates, etc. They are of fundamental importance in the STEM […]

Jengod at the English language Wikipedia [CC BY 2.5 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.5), GFDL (www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html) or CC-BY-SA-3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/)], via Wikimedia Commons

Compute Average Heights

3rd May 2015

This is a simple program to compute average heights. In a loop, it prompts the user for heights, inputs a text string and converts it to a ‘real’ number, sums them, and divides by the number of heights. Exit is signalled by negative height, after which the sum of the numbers is divided by the number of […]

Binary Search

27th April 2015

Binary Search is one of the most fundamental computer algorithms. Given an ordered list of some data (names, numbers, …) find out if it contains a particular item. For example, consider the list: 2, 4, 5, 7, 8, 11, 12. If we ask if it contains the number 5, the algorithm should return 2 (counting […]

Python Programming Resources

27th April 2015

If you’re looking for information, books, tutorials, blogs, editors & IDEs, etc about the Python programming language, then I humbly suggest you could do worse than checking out my curated list on Zeef, which is mirrored on this site. It covers a wide range of topics, e.g. Advanced Python Programming ♦ Beginning Python Programming ♦ Blogs […]

Random Walk

18th April 2015

A colourful random walk. The basic idea is very simple: choose a random heading in the range 0:360 degrees. Step in that direction. Choose another random heading & step again. Do this 2,000 times. As a bonus, we go through all the colours of the rainbow (or something similar) from beginning to end. Dealing with […]

Turtle Star

18th April 2015

A very simple Turtle program. Turtle can draw intricate shapes using programs that repeat simple moves. Turtle graphics is a popular way for introducing programming to kids. It was part of the original Logo programming language developed by Wally Feurzig and Seymour Papert in 1966. Imagine a robotic turtle starting at (0, 0) in the […]

Sierpinski Triangle, drawn by a Turtle

18th April 2015

This is a classic fractal drawn with a recursion algorithm and Turtle graphics. The Sierpinski Triangle’s sides are bisected and the triangle they form is removed. The procedure is then applied to the 3 remaining triangles, and to them recursively or until the Universe ends. Note that the use of recursion allows the code to […]

Square Spiral

18th April 2015

This is a very simple introduction to Turtle graphics. The turtle starts in the middle of the window, moves forward a small distance, turns right, moves forward a slightly longer distance, right again, even further this time… until the distance equals or exceeds a given limit. Turtle graphics is a popular way for introducing programming […]

Naive Mandelbrot Set

17th April 2015

This is your basic Mandelbrot Set plotter. Very little effort made to speed it up, except for plotting top & bottom pixels together as they’re mirrored across the x-axis. Later I’ll show you some much faster programs! The heart of this program is the iteration of z2+c where c is a point in the complex […]